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Tagged with: Bacteria

American University Radio Show, "Speak Freely" on 1A Presents Why We’re All At Risk When Bacteria Resist

03/28/2017

More dangerous and deadly bacteria are answering the battle cry of "resist!"

 

WHO Sets Priority for Emerging Diseases Research

12/22/2015

"The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued an initial list of diseases needing urgent research attention to prevent severe outbreaks. This list, which includes Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever, Ebola and Marburg virus diseases, Lassa fever, Middle East respiratory syndrome and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus diseases, Nipah, and Rift Valley fever, is expected to be a key element in the WHO Research and Development (R&D) Blueprint for infectious diseases with epidemic potential currently under development for presentation in May 2016 at the 69th World Health Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland."

Dirty Yamuna water harbours drug-resistant bacteria

12/07/2015

Excerpt: "The Yamuna river is harbouring a high number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria which can have serious ecological and public health implications, a recent study published in the latest issue of International Journal of Bio Assays has revealed. 

Strengthening the global concern that the development of resistance for antibiotics in bacteria will make the use of these antibiotics ineffective in humans, the study has reported that all the isolated E. coli strains in the Yamuna were found to be resistant to most of the tested antibiotics. 

This may be explained by high and uncontrolled use of these antibiotics in humans and animals apart from pollution from pharmaceutical companies as well as heavy metals or biocides."

Original article: 

Bhardwaj R, Gupta A, Garg JK: Prevalence of multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli strains isolated from river Yamuna, Delhi stretch.
International J Bioassays, 2015; 4(11): 4492-8; available at <http://www.ijbio.com/index.php/ijb/article/view/828/pdf>

This Is the Scariest Superbug Yet

12/03/2015

Excerpt: "In mid-November, a group of Chinese and UK researchers published a paper in The Lancet delivering some sobering news: They had found a strain of E. coli in Chinese pigs that had evolved to withstand colistin, a potent antibiotic widely considered to be a last resort against a variety of pathogens that can resist antibiotics. Worse, the gene that allowed the E. coli to shrug off colistin easily jumps among bacterial species, and is thus "likely to spread rapidly into key human pathogens"—think fun stuff like salmonella and Klebsiella. The cherry on top: The authors warn that these colistin-defying nasties are "likely" to go global."

More than 120 Partners Join CDC to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

11/16/2015

Excerpt: "The President has proclaimed Nov. 16-22 “Get Smart About Antibiotics Week.”    Get Smart Week builds on the momentum generated at the White House Forum on Antibiotic Stewardship, where more than 150 organizations pledged to improve antibiotic use and slow the spread of antibiotic resistance.

Antibiotic resistance – the rise of deadly germs no longer stopped by the drugs that once controlled them – threatens to take us back to the days when minor infections commonly killed.

CDC estimates that each year two million Americans get an infection with an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Every year 23,000 of those patients die. CDC has made combating antibiotic resistance a top priority and is partnering with public institutions and private industry to overcome this challenge. It is critical to use these life-saving drugs when truly necessary, such as when treating patients with sepsis, while also using the right drug at the right dose and duration to  protect the effectiveness of antibiotics."

Deadly bacteria can kill your dog, lurks in Southwest Florida waterways

11/09/2015

CAPE CORAL, FLA.- A deadly bacteria lurking in canals, lakes, and standing water, here in Southwest Florida, could attack your dog with little warning, and your dog could then transfer that disease to you.

It's called leptospirosis and it's spread through wildlife, like raccoons or rats, urinate into local waterways. Their contaminated urine contains bacteria can spread and grow in the water, or even in your backyard, according to Dr. Justin Kerr with Kindness Animal Hospital. 

Anthrax case confirmed on farm in Westbury, Wiltshire

10/27/2015

"A case of anthrax has been confirmed in a cow on a farm in Wiltshire, Public Health England has said.

This case was "rapidly detected" after the death of the animal in Westbury last week. The cow has been incinerated and movement restrictions are in place.

Public Health England said any risk of infection to those who were in close contact with the animal was "very low".

Anthrax is a bacterial disease which primarily affects grazing animals, although all mammals are susceptible."

Migratory Songbirds Transport New Ticks & Pathogens Across the Gulf

10/21/2015

Excerpt: "An invasion of 19 million ticks. It might sound like the plot of a horror movie, but it’s real, and it happens every spring as migratory songbirds transport ticks — and the pathogens they carry — into the United States.

As covered previously on Cool Green Science, researchers from The Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center (SMBC) and Texas A&M University are trying to figure out just how many ticks and tick-borne pathogens neotropical songbirds are transporting from Central and South America during their annual migration.

And now they have an answer. Their results, recently published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, reveal that neotropical songbirds are transporting an estimate of more than 19 million non-native ticks species into the country each year."

Global Impact of Tropical Disease Leptospirosis Underestimated: Study

09/17/2015

Excerpt:

More than 1 million people contract a tropical disease known as leptospirosis each year, resulting in nearly 59,000 deaths, a new study shows.

That worldwide estimate of the impact of the illness, which typically affects underdeveloped areas in Latin America, Africa, Asia and island nations, is far greater than previously thought, the Yale School of Public Health researchers noted.

"The study identified an important health burden caused by this life-threatening disease, which has been long neglected because it occurs in the poorest segments of the world's population," study leader Albert Ko, chair of the department of epidemiology of microbial disease at Yale, said in a news release from the New Haven, Conn.-based university.

"At present, there are no effective control measures for leptospirosis. The study provides national and international decision makers with the evidence to invest in initiatives aimed at preventing the disease, such as development of new vaccines," Ko added.

Spirochetal bacteria, which is found in the urine of rats and other mammals, causes leptospirosis. The germ can survive in soil and water, infecting people through cuts and scrapes on the skin. In developing countries, leptospirosis can lead to bleeding in the lungs and kidney failure.

Why infectious disease research needs community ecology

09/04/2015

BACKGROUND: Despite ongoing advances in biomedicine, infectious diseases remain a major threat to human health, economic sustainability, and wildlife conservation. This is in part a result of the challenges of controlling widespread or persistent infections that involve multiple hosts, vectors, and parasite species. Moreover, many contemporary disease threats involve interactions that manifest across nested scales of biological organization, from disease progression at the within-host level to emergence and spread at the regional level. For many such infections, complete eradication is unlikely to be successful, but a broader understanding of the community in which host-parasite interactions are embedded will facilitate more effective management. Recent advances in community ecology, including findings from traits-based approaches and metacommunity theory, offer the tools and concepts to address the complexities arising from multispecies, multiscale disease threats.

IDSA Convenes New National Stakeholder Group on Antimicrobial Resistance

09/04/2014

"Today the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) launched the U.S. Stakeholder Forum on Antimicrobial Resistance (S-FAR) and released the Forum’s foundational principles. More than 75 national organizations, representing medical and allied health professionals, hospitals and other healthcare facilities, patients and consumers, public health, research and advocacy, industry, and international health organizations have joined the partnership so far. Partners will convene for the inaugural S-FAR meeting in Philadelphia on Oct. 9, 2014."

Research by Intracellular Pathogens Research Lab Advances Understanding of Bartonella–the ‘stealth pathogen’

09/27/2010

The following article by the Veterinary Information Network (VIN) News Service profiles the ongoing Bartonella research being conducted by the Intracellular Pathogens Research Laboratory (IPRL) within the CVM Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research. Directed by Dr. Ed Breitschwerdt, the work of the IRPL is an example of the “One Medicine” concept and the importance of the connections between animal and human health and veterinary and human medicine.

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